The Oakland Athletics Tickets : The Team Had Some Prominent Success In Philadelphia

.tags The Oakland Athletics are a Major League Baseball team based in Oakland, California. The Athletics are a member of the Western Division of Major League Baseball’s American League. From 1968 to the present, the Athletics have played in the Oakland Coliseum.

The “Athletics” name originates from the late 19th century “athletic clubs”, specifically the Athletic (Baseball Club) of Philadelphia. They are most prominently nicknamed “the A’s”, in reference to the Gothic script “A”, a trademark of the team and the old Athletics of Philadelphia. This has gained very prominent use, and in some circles is used more frequently than the full “Athletics” name.

They are also known as “the White Elephants” or simply “the Elephants”, in reference to then New York Giants’ manager John McGraw’s calling the team a “white elephant”.

This was embraced by the team, who then made a white elephant the team’s mascot, and often incorporated it into the logo or sleeve patches. During the team’s 1970s heyday, management often referred to the team as The Swingin’ A’s, referencing both their prodigious power and to connect the team with the growing disco culture.

One of the American League’s eight charter franchises, the club was founded in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1901 as the Philadelphia Athletics. The team had some prominent success in Philadelphia, winning 3 of 4 World Series from 1910 to 1914 (the “First Dynasty”) and two in a row in 1929 and 1930 (the “Second Dynasty”).

The team’s owner and manager for its first 50 years was Connie Mack, and its Hall-of-Fame players included Chief Bender, Frank “Home Run” Baker, Jimmie Foxx, and Lefty Grove. After two decades of decline, however, the team left Philadelphia for Kansas City in 1955 and became the Kansas City Athletics. After 13 mostly uneventful seasons in the Midwest, the team moved to Oakland in 1968.

There a “Third Dynasty” soon emerged, with three World Championships in a row from 1972 to 1974 led by players including Catfish Hunter and Reggie Jackson and colorful owner Charlie O. Finley. Finally, a “Fourth Dynasty” won three consecutive pennants and the 1989 World Series behind Mark McGwire, Jose Canseco, and Dennis Eckersley.

In more recent years, the A’s have often been playoff contenders but have not returned to the World Series since 1990. They have become known for the efforts of general manager Billy Beane to get maximum value out of limited financial resources, as described in the widely-read book Moneyball.

The Athletics’ name originated in the term “Athletic Club” for local gentlemen’s clubs dates to 1860 when an amateur team, the Athletic (Club) of Philadelphia, was formed. (A famous image from that era, published in Harper’s Weekly in 1866, shows the Athletic players dressed in uniforms displaying the familiar blackletter “A” on the front).

The team later turned professional through 1875, becoming a charter member of the National League in 1876, but were expelled from the N.L. after one season. A later version of the Athletics played in the American Association from 1882/1891.

The team name is typically pronounced “Ath-LET-ics”, but their longtime team owner/manager Connie Mack called them by the old-fashioned colloquial Irish pronunciation “Ath-uh-LET-ics”. Newspaper writers also often referred to the team as the Mackmen during their Philadelphia days, in honor of their patriarch.

No A’s player from the Philadelphia era has his number retired by the organization. Though Jackson and Hunter played small portions of their careers in Kansas City, no player that played the majority of his years in the Kansas City era has his number retired either. As of 2009, the A’s have retired only the numbers of members of the Hall of Fame that played large portions of their careers in Oakland.The A’s retired Rickey Henderson’s #24 jersey on August 1, 2009.